Donald Judd: Complete Writings 1959–1975

Gallery Reviews, Book Reviews, Articles, Letters to the Editor, Reports, Statements, Complaints

Originally published in 1975, this collection of Donald Judd's writings is a sought-after classic.

Complete Writings 1959–1975 was first published in 1975 by The Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and since then it has been the primary source for Donald Judd’s early writing. Working as an art critic for the magazines ArtsArts Magazine, and later Art International, Judd regularly contributed reviews of contemporary art exhibitions between 1959 and 1965, but continued to write throughout his life on a broad range of subjects. In his reviews and essays, Judd discussed in detail the work of more than 500 artists showing in New York in the early and mid-1960s, and provided a critical account of this significant era of art in America. While addressing the social and political ramifications of art production, the writings frequently addressed the work of such artists as Jackson Pollock, Kazimir Malevich, Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Lee Bontecou, Yayoi Kusama, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, Kenneth Noland, and Claes Oldenburg. Judd’s essay "Specific Objects," first published in 1965, remains central to the analysis of the new art developed in the early 1960s. Other essays included in this publication are "Complaints I" (1969), "Complaints II" (1973) and his previously unpublished essay "Imperialism, Nationalism and Regionalism" (1975), all of which establish the polemical importance of Judd’s writing.

$45.00

Publisher: Judd Foundation

Artists: Donald Judd

Publication Date: 2016

Binding: Softcover

Dimensions: 8 1/2 x 11 in (21.6 x 27.9 cm)

Pages: 240

Reproductions: 300 b&w

ISBN: 9781938922930

Retail: $45 | £30

Status: Available

Stock: Unavailable

Stock: Out of Stock

Donald Judd

The work of Donald Judd (1928–1994), one of the most significant American artists of the postwar period, has come to define what has been referred to as minimalist art—a label to which the artist strongly objected on the grounds of its generality. The unaffected, straightforward quality of Judd’s work demonstrates his strong interest in color, form, material, and space. With the intention of creating work that could assume a direct material and physical “presence” without recourse to grand philosophical statements, he eschewed the classical ideals of representational sculpture to create a rigorous visual vocabulary that sought clear and definite objects as its primary mode of articulation.

All Donald Judd books